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posticon demon hierarchy


Misc. Medieval Hierarchies
THE SEVEN PRINCES OF HELL
Baal-beryth - Master of rituals and pacts

Dumah - Commander of the demons of gehenna

Meririm - Prince of air

Rahab - Prince of oceans

Sariel - Prince of the moon

Mephistopholes - the Destroyer

Lucifer Rofocale - Prime minister and Chief of the Treasury

 

ARCH DEMONS OF HELL
Adramaleck - Prince of Fire

Carniveau - Demon of Possession

Python - Prince of lying spirits

Mammon - Prince of temptors, avarice, and greed

Rimmon - Prince of lightning and storms

 

ARCH SHE-DEMONS
One of the Very Few All Female Demon Hierarchies.

Leviathan - The Chaos Dragon

Barbelo - Unknown

Proserpine - Destroyer

Astarte - Queen of spirits of the dead

Agrat-bat-mahlaht - One of Satan's wives and demoness of whores

Eisheth Zenunim - Same as above

Lilith - Satan's favorite wife

Naamah - demoness of seduction



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Oct/1/2007, 12:34 pm Link to this post Send Email to MaTTsWoRld   Send PM to MaTTsWoRld Blog
 
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Re: demon hierarchy


Proserpine and Astarte are Goddesses, Proserpine is the Roman version of Persephone and Astarte is the Goddess of love and fertility, in Summerian tradition. It is demeaning to refer to them as demons.

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Re: demon hierarchy


those are not my word's but taken from another website

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Oct/2/2007, 7:13 am Link to this post Send Email to MaTTsWoRld   Send PM to MaTTsWoRld Blog
 
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Re: demon hierarchy


Astarte in Ugarit
Astarte appears in Ugaritic texts under the name ‘Athtart but is of little importance in those texts. ‘Athtart and ‘Anat together hold back Ba‘al from attacking the other gods. Astarte also asks Ba‘al to "scatter" Yamm "Sea" after Ba‘al's victory. ‘Athtart is called the "Face of Ba‘al".


 Astarte in Egypt
Astarte first appears in Ancient Egypt beginning in the Eighteenth dynasty of Egypt along with other deities who were worshipped by northwest Semitic people. She was especially worshipped in her aspect of a war goddess, often paired with the goddess Anat.

In the Contest Between Horus and Set, these two goddesses appear as daughters of Re and are given in marriage to the god Set, here identified with the Semitic name Hadad. Astarte was also identified with the goddess Sekhmet but seemingly more often conflated, at least in part, with Isis to judge from the many images found of Astarte suckling a small child. Indeed there is a statue of the 6th century BC in the Cairo Museum, which would normally be taken as portraying Isis with her child Horus on her knee and which in every detail of iconography follows normal Egyptian conventions but the dedicatory inscription reads: "Gersaphon, son of Azor, son of Slrt, man of Lydda, for his Lady, for Astarte." See G. Daressy, (1905) pl. LXI (CGC 39291).

Plutarch, in his On Isis and Osiris, indicates that the King and Queen of Byblos, who unknowingly have the Osiris' body in a pillar in their hall, are Melcarthus (ie. Melqart) and Astarte (though he notes some instead call the Queen Saosis or Nemanūs, which Plutarch interprets as corresponding to the Greek name Athenais).


 Astarte described by Sanchuniathon
In the description of the Phoenician pantheon ascribed to Sanchuniathon Astarte appears as a daughter of Sky and Earth and sister of the God El. After El overthrows and banishes his father Sky, Sky sends to El as some kind of trick his "virgin daughter" Astarte along with her sisters Asherah and the goddess who will later be called Ba‘alat Gebul "the Lady of Byblos". It seems that this trick does not work as all three become wives of their brother El. Astarte bears to El children who appear under Greek names as seven daughters called the Titanides or Artemides and two sons named Pothos "Longing" and Eros "Desire".

Later we see, with El's consent, Astarte and Hadad reigning over the land together. Astarte, puts the head of a bull on her own head to symbolize Her sovereignty. Wandering through the world Astarte takes up a star that has fallen from the sky and consecrates it at Tyre.


 Astarte in Judea
The Masoretic pointing in the Hebrew Tanach (bible) indicate the pronunciation as ‘Aštōret instead of the expected ‘Ašteret, probably because the two last syllables have here been pointed with the vowels belonging to bōshet "abomination" to indicate that word should be substituted when reading. The plural form is pointed ‘Aštārōt.

For what seems to be the use of the Hebrew plural form ‘Aštārōt as the name of a demon, see also Astaroth.

Astarte, or Ashtoret in Hebrew, was the principal goddess of the Phoenicians, representing the productive power of nature. She was a lunar goddess and was adopted by the Egyptians as a daughter of Ra or Ptah.

In Jewish mythology, She is referred to as Ashtoreth, supposedly interpreted as a female demon of lust in Hebrew monotheism. The name Asherah may also be confused with Ashtoreth, but is probably a different Goddess.

In Judaized Christian demonology, Ashtoreth is connected to Friday, and visually represented as a young woman with a cow's horns on her head (sometimes with a cow's tail too).



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you smile because iam different,i laugh because your all the same

Oct/2/2007, 9:52 am Link to this post Send Email to MaTTsWoRld   Send PM to MaTTsWoRld Blog
 


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