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The Orphans' Screams
Bedern, York


 Bedern, off Goodramgate, was the medieval home of the Minister's Vicars Choral. The choristers finally moved out in 1574 and, unfortunately, the area degenerated in region of slums and warehouses. By the mid-19th century, a sort of orphanage-cum-workhouse was established here known as the York Industrial Ragged School. Its master was paid handsomely to round up local waifs and strays and put them to work and he was keen to keep hold of his earnings. The avaricious man paid out little on food and clothing for his workforce and the children died in great numbers - of starvation and exposure.
Being too lazy to even dispose of the bodies, the schoolmaster would lock them up in a large cupboard until the stench would eventually force him to clear up. In the cold Yorkshire winters, he would be prevented from digging even the shallowest of graves and was forced to leave the corpses to rot.

As the months passed, however, the bodies piled up and the master began to become convinced that he could hear terrified screams emanating from the padlocked cupboard. They played on his guilty conscience so much that he eventually went completely mad and ran through the school massacring the remaining children with a huge knife. The authorities discovered him next morning, whimpering amongst heaps of mutilated bodies. He was dragged off to the local asylum where he spent the rest of his life.

The restless spirits of the dead children are still occasionally seen in the area. More usually, however, it is their playful laughter which is heard. The passer by may stop to listen to the eerie sound but, as they do, it changes dramatically into screams of terror!




The Grey Lady, Buried Alive!
Theatre Royal, York


 The structure of the Georgian Theatre Royal incorporates parts of the old Hospital of St. Leonard which, in the Middle Ages, was run by a strict order of nuns. One of these ladies, it is said, fell in love with a young nobleman and her feelings were not unrequited. Unfortunately, the lovers were discovered! - and for breaking her vow of chastity, the nun was thrown into a windowless room which was immediately bricked up to form the poor girl's living tomb!
A room behind the dress circle is still pointed out as the place where this macabre event took place. Even today it retains a cold and eerie atmosphere. The nun herself appears in faded grey on occasion. She is always peaceful and friendly and apparently heralds great success for the theatre's current production.






Murder & Betrayal
Minster Yard, York


 Life was hard in 16th century Britain and the situation in York was no exception. Many young lads, down on their luck, found a life of crime to be an easy way out of the gutter. Pick-pockets and cut-throats were common place amongst the small alleys and snickelways of the city: even within the Minster Yard.
On a dark still night, two brothers, desperate to boost their meagre earnings, lurked with malicious intent in the shadows near their lodgings at St. William's College. Their victim was to be a wealthy priest from the nearby Minster. As the poor man came into view, the two sprang upon him, slit his throat and made off with his purse and the jewels about his person.

The younger brother had never really wanted to take part in such drastic action and, later that night, racked with guilt, he shut himself and his booty in a closet in the College. The elder, fearing his sibling would break down and confess their crimes, decided to report his brother to the authorities. The young brother was immediately arrested, tried and hanged for murder. He never knew of his brother's betrayal and kept his involvement quiet.

It was now the elder brother's turn to feel the guilt and he paste his rooms at the College both day and night. Over the next few years, he neglected his health totally and soon brought himself to an early grave. His disquiet spirit still paces the upstairs corridor and rooms of St. William's College even today.


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you smile because iam different,i laugh because your all the same

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Re: york ghosts


The Headless Earl
Holy Trinity Goodramgate, York


 Thomas Percy, the 7th Earl of Northumberland, was one of the most powerful men in 16th century England. As a staunch catholic, he continually opposed the reign of the protestant queen, Elizabeth I, from his strongholds in the North. He was involved in a long series of unsuccessful intrigues, battles and sieges designed to overthrow the lady, before finally having to flee to Scotland.
Betrayed and captured, Northumberland was eventually dragged in chains back to York to be executed for treason. Both the Pope and the King of Spain tried to buy a stay of execution, but it was not to be. Thomas was beheaded on 22nd August 1572 and his head stuck on a large spike on Micklegate Bar as a warning to would be traitors. It remained there for many years until it was eventually rescued by a sympathiser and buried in the churchyard of Holy Trinity Goodramgate. To this day, the headless form of the Earl staggers between the graves, of a night, searching for his capital loss.





Romans on their Knees
Treasurer's House, York


 One morning in 1953, an apprentice plumber, named Harry Martindale, was installing a new central heating system in the cellars of the Treasurer's House when he heard the distinctive sound of a distant horn. He thought it strange that the sound should reach him so far underground, but carried on working up his ladder. The horn continued to sound, each time appearing a little closer.
Suddenly a huge great cart horse emerged straight through the brick wall of the cellar! Harry fell off his ladder in shock and, as he crouched on the floor, he was able to see clearly that the horse was being ridden by a dishevelled Roman soldier. He was slowly followed by several fellows, dressed in rough green tunics and plumed helmets, carrying short swords and spears. They all looked down in a dejected manner as they continued towards the Minster, apparently on their knees! As they reached the centre of the room, however, they emerged into a recently excavated area and it became clear that they were walking on the old Roman road buried 15 inches below the surface!

Harry scrambled frantically up the cellar steps to safety of the ground floor. Here he was met by the house's curator who exclaimed, "You've seen the Roman soldiers, haven't you?" Apparently the ghostly troop had been seen several times in the past and impressive descriptions have been forthcoming from a number of witnesses. Sadly, the cellar is not open to the public, so further sightings seem unlikely.





An Uninvited Funeral Guest
All Saints' Pavement, York


 All Saints Pavement is amongst the most attractive of York Churches. It has been much altered over the centuries and whole sections have been completely lost. A visitor who also now seems to have gone is the most beautiful ghost in York. A stunning young woman with extremely long hair in clustered curls, she used to appear in a long white shroud, welcoming funeral processions at the open door of the church.
The lady became famous because her appearances occurred in the middle of the day, but no-one has ever managed to discover her story and her manifestations remain a mystery. It has been suggested that she was denied a Christian burial in some way and was seeking to correct this at each parish funeral but, as she no longer appears, the truth will probably never be discovered.



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you smile because iam different,i laugh because your all the same

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The Queen of Roses
King's Manor, York


The Principal's House at the King's Manor, to the right of the entrance, is one of the more recently erected buildings in this ancient complex. It was therefore thought strange when a maid at the Manor was found unconscious there, having fainted from shock at the sight of a ghostly Tudor Lady. She appeared from a cupboard and walked straight through her!
As the apparition was seen on successive occasions, details emerged of her fine green dress and the [sign in to see URL], the roses which she carried in her hands. It has been suggested that she was the ill-fated Queen Catherine Howard who was wonderfully entertained at the King's Manor with Henry VIII in 1541. However, she also secretly played host to her lover, Thomas Culpeper, here and was executed soon afterward.

Though the details of the Lady's costume were spot on, the setting did not fit and the story was forgotten. Only years later was it discovered that this area of the grounds was the site of a former Rose Garden.




According to the Ghost Research Foundation International (GRFI), “York is the most haunted city in the world with a total of 504 recorded hauntings”. The GRFI visited major cities such as Los Angeles, Brisbane and Paris but their paranormal activity cannot compare to York, England. Find out why York has earned this reputation.

York Treasurer’s House
In 1953, an apprentice plumber was installing a new central heating system in the cellar of the Treasurer’s House. He heard the sound of a horn in the distance which became louder and louder. All of a sudden, a horse and rider came through the cellar wall. The rider wore a helmet and armour which was worn by Roman soldiers. A column of Roman soldiers followed, dressed in green tunics and plumed helmets, carrying shields and spears. One soldier had a long trumpet which explained the horn sound as the soldiers approached. The strange thing was; the soldiers’ feet and part of their legs were not visible.

They walked across the basement heading toward a recently excavated area. It was discovered that the Treasurer’s House was built on top of an old Roman road which was 15 inches below the basement floor. The soldiers were walking directly on the road, which explains why their feet and lower legs could not be seen.

York Theatre Royal
Quite often, the ghost of a nun is seen in the room behind the dress circle of the theatre. She is known as the Grey Lady. In Medieval times, the theatre was part of St Leonard’s Hospital, which was run by nuns. It is believed that the nun was the lover of a nobleman and when their love affair was discovered, she was thrown into a windowless room. The entrance was bricked over and she was left there to die. It is supposed to be a good omen if the Grey Lady is seen by the performers.

There is also the ghost of an actor who died during a duel. He is sometimes spotted backstage or in the wings watching the performance on stage.

Clifford’s Tower York
This tower was used by the Jews as a place of refuge during their persecution during the Middle Ages. During one raid, the Jews were surrounded and committed suicide in the Tower rather than surrendering. It is said that the ground of Clifford's Tower can turn red, resembling the colour of blood. Even after the floor was dug out and replaced, the red stains continued.

Yorkshire Museum Library
A particular book was found laying on the library floor several Sunday nights in a row. After several weeks, a caretaker saw the figure of an old man searching a library shelf. The book belonged to a solicitor who had died several years before. When the caretaker was shown a picture of the solicitor, he said the ghost looked exactly like this person. Inside the book, it looks like a document or photo had been there because a brown stain was detected. Perhaps the solicitor came back to retrieve this document. The caretaker also reported that the alarm bells would trigger for no reason and this continued until the book was removed from the shelves.

York Castle
In 1717, Sir John Reresby saw a piece of paper blowing in the wind and it turned into a monkey and then a bear. It is believed that this could have been a hallucination.


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you smile because iam different,i laugh because your all the same

Nov/19/2008, 7:21 pm Link to this post Send Email to MaTTsWoRld   Send PM to MaTTsWoRld Blog
 


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